About Fitz Hugh Curtis Syndrome

About Fitz Hugh Curtis Syndrome

Definitions, Medical
The Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, short FHC syndrome occurs predominantly as a complication after an inflammation of the pelvis on. Abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting occur. What is Fitz-Hugh-Curtis Syndrome? According to USVSUKENGLISH.COM, the disease was first noticed by a Uruguayan surgeon in 1920. It was first described by the American gynecologist Arthur Hale Curtis. In 1934 an American internist was able to confirm Curtis' observations. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is therefore a complication of a previous inflammation of the pelvis. In most cases this is caused by chlamydia or other bacteria and leads to inflammation in the liver and diaphragm. The Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is therefore also known as perihepatitis. Causes Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is a complication of an ascending bacterial infection of the female genital area. The disease is often caused by chlamydia or…
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About Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome

About Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome

Definitions, Medical
The superior orbital fissure syndrome is characterized by the failure of several cranial nerves, which are responsible for the supply of various eye muscles and the sensitive innervation in the eye area. The clinical picture is very complex and is caused by space-consuming processes. What is Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome? According to THEINTERNETFAQS.COM, the superior orbital fissure syndrome is a complex clinical picture due to the failure of several cranial nerves in the area of the superior orbital fissure. The superior orbital fissure is a large space between the small and large sphenoid bone (os sphenoidale). The middle cranial fossa (fossa cranii media) is connected to the eye socket (orbit) through this gap. The superior orbital fissure serves as an opening for various structures. These include the oculomotor nerve (III…
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About Fish Poisoning

About Fish Poisoning

Definitions, Medical
There are different types of fish poisoning that can be fatal for those affected. While fish poisoning caused by toxins, for example, can be very dangerous, bacterial fish poisoning is usually more harmless. What is fish poisoning? According to TECHNOLOGY-WIKI.COM, fish poisoning is a classic food poisoning caused by eating overlaid or infected fish. In most cases it is bacterial poisoning from contaminated fish. Various pathogens can be considered in this regard. Viruses and toxins are also among the risk causes. Fish poisoning caused by toxins is fatal in some cases. Often, however, fish poisoning only causes relatively harmless symptoms that resemble those of a normal gastrointestinal flu. Causes The cause of fish poisoning usually lies in improper storage of the fish for too long. This is particularly true of…
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About Fishbone Swallowed

About Fishbone Swallowed

Definitions, Medical
If someone has swallowed a fishbone, it is usually not a big problem. In most cases, the bone passes through the esophagus without complications into the stomach and is dissolved there. In very rare cases, however, it can lodge in the esophagus and cause health problems. What does a swallowed fishbone mean? When eating, it sometimes happens that food particles get into the windpipe if the lid of the larynx does not close properly when swallowing. An urge to cough develops, which is supposed to remove the foreign body from the windpipe. A completely different situation arises when someone swallows a fishbone. Fish bones are part of the skeleton of bony fish. According to SCIENCEDICT.COM, they are needle-like connective tissue ossifications that have no connection to the fish's spine. They…
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About Herringbone in the Throat

About Herringbone in the Throat

Definitions, Medical
When eating fish, there is sometimes the risk of accidentally swallowing a bone. In some cases the fish bone gets stuck in the throat. What does a fishbone in the throat mean? According to PSYKNOWHOW.COM,bones are bony skeletal parts of bony fish. These include connective tissue ossifications, fin rays or ribs. Before consuming any food fish, it is usually a practice to remove the bones. Nevertheless, it happens now and then that a fishbone is overlooked and swallowed while eating. This can cause the fishbone to get stuck in the throat or esophagus and cause discomfort. Due to its pointed shape, there is also the risk that the bone could get caught in the windpipe and even cause the affected person to suffocate. However, this is extremely rare. Ear, nose…
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About Fish Tapeworm Infection

About Fish Tapeworm Infection

Definitions, Medical
In our part of the world it is quite possible to get infected with a fish tapeworm. The danger is particularly great with uncooked, raw fish that you have caught yourself. What is fish tapeworm infection? According to PHOTIONARY.COM, the fish tapeworm lives mainly in fresh water. Its intermediate hosts are small freshwater fish and crustaceans that are consumed by the final hosts of the fish tapeworm (larger predatory fish, humans, dogs, cats and other fish-eating mammals). The fish tapeworm Diphyllobotrium latum is mainly found in the inland lakes of the northern hemisphere. Most brackish and freshwater fish such as trout, perch and pike are infected with the fish tapeworm. The parasite nests in the internal organs, especially the liver, but also in the muscles and in the intestinal tract…
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About Dislocated Finger

About Dislocated Finger

Definitions, Medical
The human hand is extremely delicate. A complicated interplay of tendons, muscles and joints ensures their mobility. A finger dislocation, medically: finger dislocation, is painful and leads to undesirable restrictions on movement. What is a finger dislocation? According to PHONEJUST.COM, a finger dislocation or dislocation is an injury to one or more finger joints. This leads to an opposite displacement of the joint surfaces. The unnatural position of the finger joint and finger can also be seen externally. If the joint surfaces have not completely shifted from one another, the dislocation of the fingers is referred to as subluxation or incomplete finger dislocation. While the thumb has only two phalanges, each with a connecting joint, the remaining four fingers have three phalanges each. Between them are the base joint, the…
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About Broken Finger

About Broken Finger

Definitions, Medical
According to PHONECATIONS.COM, a finger is usually broken as a result of direct forces. With appropriate therapy, a broken finger can usually be healed. What is a broken finger? In medicine from a finger fracture, spoken when a finger bone is broken when an interested party. Many different bones in the human hand can be affected by a broken finger. The so-called long fingers of the human hand each have three bones that can have a broken finger, whereas the thumb only has two bones. Depending on the severity of a broken finger, the break can be accompanied by various symptoms: As a rule, a broken finger is accompanied by severe pain. In addition, an affected finger may have swelling. If the end phalanx of a finger (i.e. the part…
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About Finger Osteoarthritis

About Finger Osteoarthritis

Definitions, Medical
From a finger arthritis or finger joint osteoarthritis women are particularly affected. Various treatments can help relieve symptoms. What is finger osteoarthritis? According to PERCOMPUTER.COM, finger arthrosis is wear and tear on articular cartilage, which is greater than the wear and tear that is typical of age. On average, finger arthrosis affects ten times more women than men; Women mainly get sick during or after the menopause. Arthrosis of the fingers manifests itself, for example, in pain in the finger joints and / or in the formation of nodules that can be felt. Although finger arthrosis can have different degrees of severity, the degree of severity is not always related to the degree of discomfort: While in some people a comparatively low degree of finger osteoarthritis leads to severe symptoms,…
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About Febrile Seizure

About Febrile Seizure

Definitions, Medical
In connection with a high fever, a febrile seizure can occur, especially in young children. A febrile seizure is associated with symptoms similar to an epileptic fit and can lead to unconsciousness in the affected children. In most cases, febrile seizures are harmless. What is a febrile seizure? According to NONPROFITDICTIONARY.COM, a febrile seizure usually occurs in connection with a high fever. Around four percent of young children are affected. Febrile seizures are most common between the ages of five months and five years. The cause of the fever is irrelevant to the occurrence of a spasm and can be quite harmless. The symptoms of a febrile seizure are similar to those of an epileptic seizure. The body stiffens, in addition to the cramping of arms and legs, the eyes…
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About Fibular Hemimelia

About Fibular Hemimelia

Definitions, Medical
In the fibular hemimelia is the congenital absence or underdevelopment of the fibula (fibula medical term). The disease is also known as a longitudinal fibular defect. It can occur either in isolation or in combination with malformations of the thigh bone, malformations of the feet or with a shortening of the entire lower leg bone. What is a fibular hemimelia? According to LAWFAQS.NET, fibular hemimelia is a disease that is very rare. It only occurs in three out of 100,000 newborns. Fibular hemimelia affects men twice as often as women. In two thirds of all sick people, only one leg is affected by the malformation. Fibular hemimelia is more common on the right leg than on the left leg. The congenital, complete absence of a shin bone, which is known…
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About Fibrous Dysplasia

About Fibrous Dysplasia

Definitions, Medical
A fibrous dysplasia is, although it is a rare disease, the most common deformity of the osseous system in childhood and adolescence. The prognosis and course of fibrous dysplasia that can be traced back to mutative changes are generally favorable. What is fibrous dysplasia? According to HOMETHODOLOGY.COM, fibrous dysplasia is a rare benign disorder or lesion of the human skeleton that is associated with bone malformations and is attributed to mutative changes. Here, there is an impaired synthesis of new bone mass (especially osteoblast differentiation), as a result of which, instead of healthy bone tissue, increased fibrous connective tissue with immature, non-lamellar trabeculae (non-fibrous trabeculae) is formed. The dysregulated bone structure causes irregular bone growth with deformations that are characterized by structural instability and an increased risk of iterative (recurring)…
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About Fibrosis (sclerosis)

About Fibrosis (sclerosis)

Definitions, Medical
Under a fibrosis, which often also called sclerosis is called, refers to a hardening of tissue and organs, which is due to an overproduction of collagen fibers. The lungs, liver, kidneys, heart or skin are often affected by fibrosis. Fibrosis is not an independent disease, but rather a symptom that can be caused by various underlying diseases. What is fibrosis? According to GROWTHEOLOGY.COM, the term fibrosis comes from the Latin "fibra" which can be translated in German as "fiber". The term refers to a pathological increase in the tissue fibers of the body, which can impair the function of the organ affected by fibrosis. Fibrosis of the lungs can manifest itself, for example, as shortness of breath, while liver fibrosis can manifest itself in high blood pressure and impaired brain…
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About Fibrosarcoma

About Fibrosarcoma

Definitions, Medical
All benign and malignant tumors that originate in the soft tissues of the human body are summarized under the generic term "soft tissue tumors". The soft tissue also includes connective tissue - a malignant tumor that has developed here is known as a fibrosarcoma. Fibrosarcomas occur only very rarely and - provided they are detected early - can be treated with a good prognosis. What is a fibrosarcoma? According to FUN-WIKI.COM, a fibrosarcoma is a malignant growth that originates in the connective tissue. A fibrosarcoma usually forms on the legs, less often on the arms and on the back. Cancer cells reach other organs via the bloodstream and form metastases there. Fibrosarcomas are very rare in adults - around 2% of all cancers are soft tissue tumors. The proportion is…
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About Fibromyalgia

About Fibromyalgia

Definitions, Medical
The fibromyalgia or fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a disease characterized by severe pain is characterized throughout the body. The causes have not yet been researched and treatment is primarily aimed at relieving the symptoms. Fibromyalgia is currently not curable, but the severity of the symptoms can weaken with age. What is fibromyalgia? According to FOODEZINE.COM, fibromyalgia, also known as fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), is a disease that causes pain in muscles, tendons and bones. Usually other diseases are initially suspected, such as rheumatism or back damage. Fibromyalgia is a generalized disease, which means that it not only causes discomfort in certain areas or a few parts of the body, but affects the entire body. Fibromyalgia usually spreads symmetrically. Patients experience muscle pain in particular, but generally have a lower pain threshold.…
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About Fibromatosis

About Fibromatosis

Definitions, Medical
According to ELECTRONICSMATTER.COM, a fibromatosis is a skin disease that is characterized by proliferation of connective tissue. In contrast to cancer, the growth is often benign. However, as a generalized congenital fibromatosis, fibromatosis can lead to death. What is fibromatosis? People who suffer from fibromatosis have growths in the collagenous connective tissue that are part of the neoplastic formations. The neoplastic formations also include cancers and other forms of uncontrolled cell growth. Fibromatosis, however, does not have the same damaging potential, but is in most cases considered to be benign or at least only slightly malignant. Certain forms of fibromatosis are a fundamental exception. Fibromatosis can manifest itself in different parts of the human body. Depending on the location of the growth, medicine differentiates between different forms of the disease.…
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About Fibroma

About Fibroma

Definitions, Medical
A fibroma is a benign, mostly discolored tumor in human skin or connective tissue. In most cases it is quite harmless and can be eliminated if it is bothersome, painful or displeasing for cosmetic reasons. The fibroma is quite common overall. What is a fibroma? According to DELUXESURVEILLANCE.COM, a fibroma usually describes a benign and tumor-like growth in human skin tissue or in connective tissue. The way in which this adhesion manifests itself is determined by the occurrence of uncontrolled cell growths, similar to those of a tumor. A fibroma is not as malignant as cancer, so it is basically harmless. Nevertheless, the skin overgrowth can cause discomfort and complications that can reduce the quality of life of the person concerned. Causes The causes of fibroids are difficult to determine…
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About Diffuse Hair Loss

About Diffuse Hair Loss

Definitions, Medical
With diffuse hair loss, which is medically called alopecia diffusa or diffuse alopecia, hair falls out over the entire head. Diffuse hair loss is not a disease in itself, but a sign or the result of an existing disease or disorder. In most cases, hair begins to grow again with treatment tailored to the trigger or after the cause has been eliminated. What is Diffuse Hair Loss? Diffuse hair loss is the gradual thinning of the scalp hair. 'Diffuse' means 'distributed' or 'scattered', that is, the hair does not only fall out in certain places, for example on the top of the head or on the forehead, but more or less evenly distributed over the whole head. According to abbreviationfinder.org, diffuse hair loss differs from hereditary hair loss, which leads…
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About Chronic Renal Failure

About Chronic Renal Failure

Definitions, Medical
According to abbreviationfinder, a chronic renal failure or CRF is characterized by a decreased kidney function over a prolonged period of time. In the final stage of the disease, the organ no longer works. However, if chronic kidney failure is detected early, a worse course can be stopped and sometimes even reversed. What is Chronic Renal Failure? Chronic kidney failure prevents the kidney from working properly. This organ normally detoxifies the body and is responsible for regulating the fluid balance. There are many potential triggers for kidney failure. Long-term diabetes mellitus or constant high blood pressure can be the cause. Typical symptoms of chronic kidney failure are overhydration, high blood pressure, edema, vomiting, anemia, nausea and potency problems. If these symptoms exist and a disease that promotes kidney disease is…
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About Cyberchondria

About Cyberchondria

Definitions, Medical
As Cyberchondria is defined as a mental disorder in which those affected by intensive research of patient awareness symptoms on the Internet develop serious fear of being seriously ill. This is a new word created from the word components "cyber" and "hypochondria". What is cyberchondria? Cyberchondria is used when those affected develop or intensify hypochondriac tendencies through information on health topics on the Internet. Research into real or imagined symptoms of illness is mostly carried out in health portals or medical lexicons. Faulty, misunderstood or dramatized representations create a distorted picture of the dangerousness of possible symptoms; an exaggerated fear of infectious diseases can also develop. Initiated and strengthened by this knowledge, psychological problems up to and including a hypochondriac disorder can arise. The patient then suffers from massive fears…
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About Brucellosis

About Brucellosis

Definitions, Medical
The Brucellosis is an infectious disease that is transmitted by certain bacteria mainly on livestock and livestock products. If the therapy is started in good time, the disease is mostly harmless. What is brucellosis? According to DigoPaul, brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the Brucella genus. Both humans and animals can be affected. Depending on the pathogen, a distinction is made between different brucellosis: The so-called Malta or Mediterranean fever is the type of brucellosis that is most commonly found in humans. It is caused by the species Brucella melitensis, which is native to the Mediterranean region, Africa and Central and South America. Bang's disease, swine and canine brucellosis are rare in humans. In Germany, brucellosis diseases are notifiable. Causes Brucellosis is usually transmitted to humans through…
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About CDAGS Syndrome

About CDAGS Syndrome

Definitions, Medical
In medicine, the CDAGS syndrome is a rare complex of malformations that is primarily associated with cranial anomalies. The symptom complex has a hereditary basis and is caused by mutation on chromosome 22. A causal therapy does not yet exist. What is CDAGS Syndrome? According to DigoPaul, CDAGS syndrome is also known as CAP syndrome and is an extremely rare hereditary disease. The prevalence is estimated to be one in 1,000,000 people. The disease was first described in the 21st century. R. Mendoza-Londono and his colleagues are considered to be the first to describe it and give it its name. The term CDAGS syndrome is an acronym. This acronym contains the clinical combination of features that characterize the symptom complex. The C stands in this connection for craniosynostosis, which shortens…
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About Chorioretinitis

About Chorioretinitis

Definitions, Medical
The Chorioretinitis is a serious inflammation of the ocular fundus, which many may be due. Without drug treatment, there is a risk of permanent visual impairment. In the worst case, blindness occurs as a result of chorioretinitis. What is chorioretinitis? Chorioretinitis is an inflammation of the retina (retina) and choroid (choroid) of the eye. The retina consists of light-sensitive sensory cells and the dissipating nerve cells. The choroid, with its intensive blood supply, supplies the tissue of the retina with nutrients and oxygen. The close connection between the retina and choroid almost always leads to a joint infestation of both tissue layers in inflammatory processes in the eye. The foci of inflammation appear as bright, yellowish-white spots, mostly scattered (chorioretinitis disseminata). An infection over the entire surface of the retina…
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About Asplenia

About Asplenia

Definitions, Medical
In the case of asplenia, the function of the spleen is disturbed or does not exist at all. This circumstance can be congenital or acquired. The spleen is an important organ in the human immune system as it is responsible for filtering certain pathogens in the blood. Usually, the body's immune system can compensate for the lack of function of the spleen. However, asplenia patients are at greater risk of developing life-threatening sepsis due to bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections. For this type of infection, these people should therefore be treated as soon as possible. What is asplenia? Asplenia is an inability of the spleen to function. The organ is also called Lien or Splen and is located in the left upper abdomen. The spleen consists of connective tissue through…
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About Autoimmune Disease

About Autoimmune Disease

Definitions, Medical
An autoimmune disease has many faces. But it is not external enemies such as viruses, bacteria, benign or malignant growths that are at work, but the body's own defenses. What is an autoimmune disease? According to DigoPaul, an autoimmune disease is a disease in which the body's own defense system attacks its own structures such as cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease is a collective term for around 60 autoimmune diseases such as B. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatism, Wegener's disease, etc. They are differentiated according to the following criteria: Organ-specific immune diseases: Excessive reactions of the immune system attack specific organs and destroy their tissues. This form is the most common. Systemic autoimmune diseases: This form is not limited to specific organs, but affects inflammatory diseases in the body, such…
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About Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

About Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

Acronyms, Medical
A disc degeneration or disc wear is characterized by wear of discs. A main therapeutic focus is on combating symptoms that occur. What is intervertebral disc degeneration? Disc degeneration is wear and tear on the intervertebral discs (the cartilage intervertebral discs in the spine). In the course of intervertebral disc degeneration abbreviated as IDD by AbbreviationFinder, the intervertebral discs become thinner and more cracked, so that they are less able to buffer the vertebral bodies against each other. This places increased stress on the vertebral bodies. In most cases, the intervertebral discs in the lumbar and / or cervical spine are affected by disc degeneration. Typical complaints that are often associated with intervertebral disc degeneration are local back pain, which can be exacerbated by muscle tension. The risk of suffering…
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About Arteriosclerosis

About Arteriosclerosis

Acronyms, Medical
A arteriosclerosis¬†is usually also called hardening of the arteries. In the course of an unhealthy lifestyle, cholesterol, fat and lime (plaque) are deposited in the arteries, which then do not allow sufficient blood or oxygen to pass through an arterial constriction. What is atherosclerosis? The popularly known disease of hardening of the arteries is referred to in medicine as arteriosclerosis or atherosclerosis. According to DigoPaul, it is a disease of the blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to supply other organs with oxygen. This then leads to a narrowing of the vessels. Atherosclerosis is triggered by so-called plaque, which in turn can consist of fats, lime, clots and leg tissue. Over the years, it sticks to the walls of the blood vessels and thus allows less…
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About Adenoids

About Adenoids

Definitions, Medical
An enlargement of the tonsils is called adenoid or adenoid vegetation . They are a typical problem in childhood and can lead to various health disorders. It is not uncommon for the adenoids to be surgically removed. What are adenoids? The Waldeyer'sche throat ring consists of tongue almond, palatine almond and pharyngeal almond. Adenoid or adenoid vegetation is the name given to the enlargement of the tonsils , for which doctors also use the term hyperplasia. Enlarged tonsils can become a mechanical problem by constricting the nasopharynx and / or leading to chronic inflammatory changes that affect not only the pharynx, but also the lungs and middle ear. Children between the ages of 3 and 7 are almost exclusively affected, as the pharyngeal tonsil tissue regresses with puberty ; in…
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About Acute Intermittent Porphyria

About Acute Intermittent Porphyria

Definitions, Medical
As acute intermittent porphyria , a subtype of porphyria is called. In this inherited disease, the organism is not able to correctly produce the blood pigment heme. What is Acute Intermittent Porphyria? In this inherited disease, the organism is not able to correctly produce the blood pigment heme. Heme is a component of hemoglobin, the red pigment in the blood. Acute intermittent porphyria ( AIP ) is one of four types of acute porphyria. The other three types are called hereditary coproporphyria , porphyria variegata and Doss porphyria . What they all have in common is that they suddenly experience abdominal pain that sometimes lasts for a few days. Acute intermittent porphyria, which is the most common form, is of particular medical relevance. It shows up primarily in women. Causes…
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About Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

About Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

Acronyms, Medical
A Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a hereditary disease, which is characterized by a defective synthesis of alpha-1-antitrypsin in the liver, causing damage to the liver and lungs. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is one of the causes of respiratory diseases that is often not recognized or recognized late. What is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a hereditary disease that has lasting negative effects on the lungs and liver. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a hereditary disease that has lasting negative effects on the lungs and liver. Since the gene responsible for the disease can be subject to various mutations, different clinical pictures can emerge. These range from mild forms of the disease that cannot be accompanied by any symptoms to severe forms of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency which can lead to cirrhosis…
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