About Fuzz Testing

About Fuzz Testing

Acronyms, Technology
What is fuzz testing? The search for bugs is usually done in an orderly manner. Fuzz testing, on the other hand, is characterized by adding random records. In this way, errors can be discovered that conventional test mechanisms remain hidden. In IT, a genesis myth is not necessarily one of the basic requirements for well-implemented methods. Nevertheless, there is a very clear history of the origin of what is known as fuzz testing. In the late 1980s, Barton Miller, a computer science professor in Madison, Wisconsin, used a landline connection to work from home at his Unix terminal at the university. During a thunderstorm, the signals did not come through the line as expected and the software received quasi random inputs between thunder and lightning. Even robust programs collapsed from…
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About Unity

About Unity

Definitions, Technology
What is Unity? Unity is a development environment for creating and designing computer games. With the help of the integrated programming environment MonoDevelop, you have the option of upgrading the numerous prefabricated Unity processes through individual programming in one of the following languages: UnityScript, C # (pronounced: C-Sharp) or Boo. Unity projects can also be used for learning and training purposes. For example, projects from the areas of VR (Virtual Reality) or AR (Augmented Reality) can be involved. Unity was first introduced in 2004. Unity is currently available in version 2017.2. Unity is offered in three different commercial versions, but also in the freely available Unity Personal version. These can be used privately or within a company if the profit is less than 100,000 US dollars per year. What are we doing with Unity? Unity…
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About Advanced Encryption Standard

About Advanced Encryption Standard

Acronyms, Technology
According to AbbreviationFinder, Advanced Encryption Standard is known as AES. In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) decided to hold a competition to choose a new encryption algorithm capable of protecting sensitive information during the 21st century. This algorithm was called Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). On January 2, 1997, NIST announced its intention to develop AES, with the help of the crypto industry and community. On September 12 of that year the formal call was made. In this call, several conditions were indicated for the algorithms to be presented: Be in the public domain, available to everyone. Be a symmetric encryption algorithm and support blocks of at least 128 bits. The encryption keys could be 128, 192 and 256 bits. Be implementable in both hardware and software. The…
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